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The Beginning, Part 2

Here we are. Again.

Like when I started this blog on October 2007, I'm taking on another "52 books in 52 weeks" project because of a break up. I won't go into details except to say this: the story of the relationship's demise could be told three ways -- his version, my version, and what really happened.

So it's time to get on with it. How?

Step 1: Remove all pictures and mementos. This also includes unfriending each other on facebook and unfriending his friends who added me while we were in the relationship.
Step 2: Eat an awfully unhealthy meal -- for two reasons. First, nothing comforts a broken heart like cheese that comes in powder form (sorry, Michael Pollan). Second, I lose my appetite in such situations, so a high caloric meal to kick things off at least puts some fuel in my body.
Step 3: Reclaim space. This meant reconfiguring the elements of what had been his temporary office in my spare room. I now have a the library I'd always planned for that room:


This room will change -- it still needs another coat of paint, but it's a start.

Step 4: Clean. I've started in my office, which had books coming out of every corner and crevice. Seriously, I found one in a desk drawer. So today I spent a good chunk of today sorting through all those galleys that publishers send me, whether wanted or not.

There was a lot of stuff in here that I'd never read. While I appreciate that Harper Collins sends me mass market paperbacks every month, what am I going to do with books like Evil Beside Her: The True Story of a Texas Woman's Marriage to a Dangerous Psychopath, The Outlaw Demon Wails and Blood Blade?

I know they're popular but not my style. So I freecycled them.

Then I set aside just about every book that had been on the shelf since the last "Book a Week" series. Sorry, Beauty Junkies: Inside Our $15 Billion Obsession With Cosmetic Surgery and The Self-Esteem Trap: Raising Confident and Compassionate Kids in an Age of Self-Importance
-- if you haven't grabbed me by now, it's time to go.

Then I went through what was left, reading first pages of books to see if I'd want to read them, and setting aside what will interest family and friends. Then I sent out an email letting said folks know that I had more books up for grabs.

After family and friends root through the pile, the books will be donated.

Then I set out to pick the first book of the series. It's not as easy as it sounds. I haven't finished reading a book in weeks. I was distracted I guess -- by the World Series, the election, the break up I felt was about to happen. It would have been fitting to read one of the dating books that are sent to me because of the work I used to do for match.com, but that seemed way too thought out. The point of the series is that it's supposed to be random. So I picked up one book from the pile, sat down to read and...realized it didn't interest me. So I went to the next, made it through the introduction, and that's where I'll begin.

Stay tuned, folks, and tell your friends. Book a Week with Jen is back.

Also, a short note: you'll see a link to my book over on the left hand side of the page. If you click on that link then shop Amazon -- whether you buy my book or not -- I make a small commission. So if you have any online shopping to do, click first to help finance this Book a Week series for another 52 selections!

Comments

Anonymous said…
He'll be sorry one day...

I'm glad you're back blogging about books. I need some motivation to update my blog!
Unknown said…
See. Yet another way women and men are different. i usually just go to the bar after my relationships fail. Eventually I stumble home and pass out.

That's a great room! What wonderful woodwork and baseboard!!
rathacat said…
Every home needs a library. I hope yours gives you healing and inspiration.
Sorry about the breakup. You're losing a boyfriend and gaining a library. That looks like a good space to curl up with a book. :)

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